A Thirst for Quench

A Thirst for Quench

As school starts up again for the year (my final year!) my attention has been focused upon the project of grand scale that lays before me: my capstone. The project that no teacher at Humber will let you forget from the first moment you sit down in a classroom. It is intended to be your greatest achievement before graduating, and to mark your transition into professional video game development. I’ve been dying to get started. And so much thought and care has gone into my plan — and Axon’s plan — to bring my capstone project to life as a commercial game called Quench. Quench is a top-down hex-based puzzle game in which the player controls the weather to assist herds of animals though desolate landscapes and the dark spirits of the past. The player uses earthquakes, lightning, wind, rain and simple psychology to guide their flock to safety, and eventually restore the world. Since Axon is working on this project as a whole, I find myself in the enviable position of having a team of some of the most talented people I know from a wide range of fields to bring to bear in creating Quench. Furthermore, Axon will be bringing another another Humber Game Programming student named James Zinger onto the team, and so Quench will be shared as our student work masterpiece. All told, the Axon team for Quench is comprised of 6 people: Myself (Jeff Rose) – Programmer and Technical Direction James Zinger – Programmer Tabby Rose – UI Design and Creative Direction William (Bill) Nyman – Game Design, Level Design and QA Albert Fung...
The Game Triforce

The Game Triforce

I want to break down game development from a specifically programming perspective. So, let’s talk about this thing we’ve been kicking around the office, which we’re calling “The Game Triforce.” The Game Triforce consists of three distinct parts: Control, Display and Timekeeping.   Created with Haiku Deck, the free presentation app for iPad   Control Control is probably the easiest component to understand. It represents all of the inputs to your system. Controls require an interface (called a human-computer interface) which is how you, the player, communicate with the box that holds the game program. Here’s a non-exhaustive list of inputs: button presses key presses and holds mouse clicks analogue stick hold input text touch and multitouch motion control accelerometer joystick dance pad voice   Display Display, which is the output of a system, is everything in the game that can be perceived by the player. Another way to look at it is as feedback to the player. Display can (and should) involve many senses, not just sight. For example, in a fighting game, if you press the button for a punch, what kind of feedback could you expect? Punching animation on player character Punching sound effect Player character power level dropping Enemy character reaction (block, hit, dodge, etc) Enemy character reaction sound effect Enemy character HP bar dropping   Timekeeping Timekeeping is the last corner on the Triforce. You might not have considered this before, but many aspects of a game require some kind of timekeeping. Timekeeping is necessary whenever an action needs to happen through time. This includes every character, background, or GUI animation, some physics calculations...